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J.Thorn

J.Thorn
J. co-authored two series of science fiction books, Dustfall and Final Awaking as well as several books on writing, including The Three-Story Method and 9 Things Career Authors Don’t Do.

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Summary

After 25 years of teaching, J. Thorn wanted more -- he wanted more challenge and more money. So he did what he warns people exactly not to do: quit his job with only a month’s salary to survive.

At first, he thought he’d devote himself full-time to writing. But he found he couldn’t spend all day doing the same thing. So he channeled his expertise and energy into a different kind of teaching—through podcasts and other venues to help writers.

He’s co-authored two series of science fiction books, Dustfall and Final Awaking as well as several books on writing, including The Three-Story Method and 9 Things Career Authors Don’t Do. I actually met J through a Story Grid seminar a couple of years ago and I really like how he approaches writing.

In this episode, J shares his struggle with wanting to act quickly on his ideas before testing them out, and how getting feedback from new followers helps him to determine how to build his next new service. He’s found teaching has also been an invaluable way to connect with and grow his audience. He also stresses how important diversification is not only for his own work but also for his bank account. He also shares his key to productivity -- something he calls time-blocking.

Now let’s get better together

Actions to Try or Advice to Take

  • Try time blocking. Instead of making to-do lists, Thorn blocks out sections of his days and weeks to work on various projects. Then, there’s no excuse for not getting it done. This is especially important for doing creative or “deep” work that requires focus for an extended period of time.
  • Focus on providing value, and you’ll get more comfortable asking for a sale.
  • Asking for a sale is all about mindset. Expose yourself to teachers and writers who teach how to sell what you have to offer so the idea is continually reinforced.

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